Life in progress

Liking Comments on WordPress

98 Comments

I’m having a bit of a love/hate relationship with the addition of the new “like” button in the comment window. My first reaction when people started putting the button on their own blogs in the comment section was that it was a lazy way of saying to someone that you either agree with them or that you enjoyed their comment. Before it showed up, one was forced to actually write out his or her thoughts. I wasn’t going to put the option of “liking” comments on my blog. Now, it seems, I don’t have a choice. If the comment shows up in the notification box, it’s fair game for a “like.”

Now I’m not saying I don’t think anyone should use them, nor am I complaining when someone “likes” one of my comments. Though I still think it’s a way to be lazy, I find it handy to use when all I really want to do is acknowledge that I’ve read a comment. Particularly if that comment is simply a πŸ™‚ Thus, my love/hate relationship with it.

What do you think of it? How do you use it the most?

Author: Linda G. Hill

There's a writer in here, clawing her way out.

98 thoughts on “Liking Comments on WordPress

  1. Sometimes it just makes sense to like/agree with a comment when someone has articulated their thoughts so clearly and so thoroughly πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Haven’t used it extensively but when a particular comment resonates with my thoughts or if it is a very nice one then I have liked them. I haven’t enabled it in my site though.

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  3. Since I am forced to do everything on my tablet or phone, and my fibro and eyes have a hard time with it all, ‘like’ and ‘share’ and ‘reblog’ are about my only way of communicating to the world that I am alive and still care. I wish those kinds of responses were everywhere. I would love a ‘sorry’ or ‘unlike’ for when folks are blogging sadness or bad situations.

    As an example of how hard it is for me to make comments beyond buttons, I have had to try to write all this four times as the table lost what I was saying. I had to get out the keyboard and put in the USB doggle sit in a very uncomfortable position where I can barely see the screen and make sure I have typed real words. πŸ™‚

    Liked by 2 people

    • Oh boy, that is a huge bother! I appreciate you going to so much trouble to write out your explanation, Dar. I’ll remember that next time I see a “like” from you. πŸ™‚
      I agree, it’s difficult when the news is sad on a post to know whether your “like” is showing support. A “sorry” button would be just the thing.
      Thanks again for the comment. Take care of yourself my dear. πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Pingback: Liking Comments on WordPress, Reevaluated | lindaghill

  5. Another button of interaction is never a bad thing. The same people that hate the “like button” as some above are saying are probably the SAME bloggers complaining about lower views when they changed the format. That is highly amusing to me… πŸ™‚

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    • Actually, now that you mention it, your comment like buttons have had a few people interacting. In fact, I’ve clicked on sites of people who have liked my comments – bloggers who I wouldn’t have otherwise necessarily noticed. I think I may try it and see what happens.
      Thanks for commenting, m’dear. πŸ™‚

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      • Heh, this comment wasn’t directed at you btw. I just find it funny when people complain about lack of interaction and views and then wordpress offers just that… a way to interact. And then people complain “oh this is like Facebook.” Makes no sense to me, can’t have it both ways.

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        • Whether the “like” button is a further way to interact isn’t the entire issue though. Yes, it’s another way to get noticed, and to notice people you wouldn’t otherwise have seen, but at the same time it’s a very shallow way to do so. That’s why I was bugging your ass off to extend your reply button down further (yes, I know why you can’t do it now) so that we could interact with each other by actually writing sentences.
          So yeah, the “like” button is better than nothing. But I think it’s far from ideal in that it can only give partial meaning to the sentiment of “like” – it can’t say why.

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  6. I don’t “like” people’s comments too often. I do sometimes, but it’s rare. I’d rather just comment back to comments on my blog. I usually “like” someone’s comment if it’s towards the end of a conversation and there isn’t much to add, but I want to let the person know that I read their comment and appreciated it.

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  7. I rarely Like comments, I consider it more as an acknowledgement. Sometimes I don’t want to Like a blog, either, because it’s sad or something, but I think Likes are good at showing acknowledgment.

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    • It’s really tough sometimes to figure out whether “liking” something means you’re liking a bad situation or just giving support. Most of the time I just see what everyone else is doing or skip it and write something. But yeah, acknowledgement is a good thing. πŸ™‚

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  8. I use the “like” on the third pass only. For example: Comment, I respond, the comment-er responds again. I like

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  9. I still get confused when I see that happen. Makes blogging feel like Facebook in a way. Soon we’ll be a species of ‘likes’ and no words. Like teenagers.

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  10. Great post! I also do not like that when I remove “like” on some posts, it still gets “like” on the email and people are “liking” it although on my public post I only have room for comments. I like that about BlogSpot ..only comments, no likes.

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  11. Linda, that’s so funny – I’ve seen the like but never even thought to use it. I just reply to the comments. Liking kinda seems redundant. Y’know?

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  12. I agree with you; it makes it easy to be lazy. Therefore, I try to only use it to say, “I liked your comment but didn’t know what else to say in response.”

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  13. I generally use it to acknowledge that I’ve read a comment and/or liked it – sort of like the Facebook “like” button. A comment/reply may or may not follow, depending on if I have anything to say in regards to it.

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  14. I didn’t even notice it lol.. But I do agree with one of your bloggers, it will feel to much like facebook. I am one that does push the like button on post that I really don’t know what to say but agree with sense it has already been said for me. (does that even make sense lol).

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  15. I mostly just use it to say I’ve read a comment, but I sometimes use it to say I read a comment and don’t know how to reply to that comment.

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  16. I use the like for two reasons; 1.) I agree/resonate, but I don’t have any comment beyond a general agreement, so nothing to add to the discussion. 2.) if someone posts a direct reply and I’m not going to respond because the conversation is at a conclusion point, I want to let them know that I read their response comment and am not ignoring it or missed reading it, so I like it. Especially if I appreciate the response.

    So, I suppose I use the Like Button as a way to express Simple Appreciation.

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  17. Okay, it’s not like I have any burning desire to click “like” on anyone’s comment, but how do you do it? I don’t see a “like” button next to any comments on this post, nor do I see it next to any comments on my posts. Hell, if I did, I’d like all my own comments because they’re that good. Yes they are.

    Liked by 1 person

  18. I was driving yesterday in a parking garage and a woman walked in front of my car kind of skittishly and instead of mouthing “thank you,” or doing the “excuse me” shuffle, she gave me a thumbs up. It made me laugh aloud. I think of the “like” button kind of like that—the meaning is broad and slightly obscure, but we get the positive intention πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    • Exactly. It’s an acknowledgement, but it’s obscure. Personally, if I have something further I want to say other than simply “I like this,” I’ll write it out. And I usually do. πŸ˜›
      Thanks for sharing your experience. πŸ™‚

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  19. I just heard through this post. I won’t use it. I refuse to make my blog like Facebook

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  20. No reall thoughts on it yet!

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  21. I will definitely like a comment if I agree with it. Whether I do or don’t agree, I respond, even if it takes a bit.

    Like

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