Linda G. Hill

Life in progress

Your WordPress Audience

146 Comments

How do you view your readers? As individuals just like you, sitting at a computer? Or as an audience? For that matter, at what point does a list of followers become an audience?

I think what separates the individual from the audience is the amount of interaction we have with our readers. And we have a choice… incite comments and reply back to them in a conversational manner or stand at the podium and preach, collecting “likes” like so much applause. All we need do is show up and display our brilliance.

But what if you could actually get every one of your followers into a room – or for some of you an Olympic-sized arena – and stand before them, each of them with laptops, and write your post for them to read while you watch? Or better yet, read it out loud and then interact with anyone who wishes to comment – would you feel less comfortable?

Ah, the relative anonymity of the internet, eh?

It’s interesting to think about though. That there are those who read our words, who judge without commenting; those we consider friends; people who drop by because they can relate and say so. But there’s also the surfers – the ones without WordPress accounts who read and nod or shake their heads and move on. Maybe they remember us and come back for more, or maybe we’re just like a song on the radio – one they’ll dismiss because it’s rap and they prefer country. I suppose they are our “audience.”

How do you describe the majority of your readers? Kindred spirits? Followers? Friends? People you would read your posts out loud to…?

Author: LindaGHill

There's a writer in here, clawing her way out.

146 thoughts on “Your WordPress Audience

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  3. I wouldn’t mind reading my posts aloud to all my audience- that includes those who just pass by and don’t say a thing.
    A number of the regulars I wouldn’t mind a beer and bbq with on any day
    and then there are those who I may not spend so much time with just as happens daily with some people I meet

    Liked by 1 person

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  6. It’s a big mix, I think. The majority are strangers on a bus and train you strike up conversations with, some you remember some not–but still the conversations are real. Others tend to ride the same route as you so you become commute friends. Some might be neighbors you see around the neighborhood and you invite them to come to a reading group at the local library or shot. Some are like coworkers you socialize with more regularly. Very few you will become true friends with and be willing to see on a more personal basis.

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  7. I would say I write to be read. Some people I’ve met in the WP community have been kind enough to follow and interact with me. I’ve come to know these people as kindred spirits. After establishing a rapport with them they’ve become my friends. We chat outside of the community and follow each other on other social media. A like to me is an acknowledgement and equal to a handshake. I liked what you wrote, and thanks for the effort. A follow is a wonderful compliment. I liked your writing style enough to stick around. Now that person may not read everything you write but will always come back because of that feeling evoked. I feel the kindred are a very special group. They offer me wonderful advice, support me on other platforms, and make me smile and feel appreciated. That’s how I found you Linda. I connected to your kindness and a friendship is the wonderful result. πŸ˜ƒ

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  8. Great post. I was thinking of this the other day. I find there is a small number who actually get involved when I post, but I do like it when they do. I really hate it when people like a post or follow me, only to get me to follow them back, then I never hear from them again (this is after they make several attempts to get me to follow them). If I find that is the case, I will unfollow after a time. I take my posts seriously and as an artform, not to simply gather numbers.

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    • I wonder sometimes if some people are just better off with a select few followers. It’s possible to make a blog private and just invite people you know to follow, but that makes it hard to make new friends. Quite a conundrum to be sure.
      Thanks very much for your comment. πŸ™‚

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  9. most are kindred spirits i think, especially the ones that take the time to comment.

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  10. Hi Linda, I have not read all your comments here (I usually try to read them so I don’t repeat what’s been said…but almost 100? No.) I write as if no one reads it, revise knowing I have no idea who’s going to read it, post and hope anyone who reads it and has something to say will do so. I do not pay much attention to ‘stats’…I don’t ‘like’ everything I read unless I…like it. I comment when I feel ‘compelled’…not just to comment. I enjoy a few readers who have become consistent readers/commentators…a dialogue, if you will. I think this forum is similar to FB, “follow”=”friends” and it has nothing to do with ‘friends’ or people who either read your post or comment…it’s just a number. I don’t even know what my number of ‘followers’ is. Good post.

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  11. It’s difficult not to interact and make friends when you’ve swapped stories or interests. I feel I’m in a community of like-minded people and we’ve become friends. πŸ™‚

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  12. Reblogged this on Idiot Writing and commented:
    I would wish to call followers, friends (in context of the article) – but I know it is just not so. Probably the majority of people who read my blog – do so silently. Which is cool…but – I do try go out and meet them on their own ‘turf’ and still give something for them to come and visit me! The problem is I cannot visit them all… I am JUST THAT popular! πŸ˜‰ (Snarky sarc please people!) I DO enjoy having a party at my place… to chat about the things that interest us. The tricky thing is that poetry for many is simply a case of – ‘Oh that is lovely’ BUT BUT BUT – SO SO Much can be spoken of with poetry – it can open doors to extremely interesting conversations! I LOVE talking about what different poems mean and the variety of meanings they COULD have – but not many do I think. SO – I try write in a different way sometimes – or – I just think screw it – here – have a pretty picture to think about. Maybe people just think about stuff when they visit?! To be fair – not much fun sitting in a room full of people thinking but then… it IS what I wish to get people to do LOTS of. Cool post Linda… I LOVE HOW YOU get people thinking!

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    • Thanks very much, Belinda, for the re-blog and the thoughtful comment. πŸ™‚ I think a lot of the lack of comments on poetry is the fear of misinterpreting… poetry does tend to leave a lot to the imagination. I rarely get comments on mine either, other than the occasional “that’s nice” or “ugh, that’s disgusting!” … which, to be honest, some of the imaginative stuff that comes out of my noggin is. Which I think is why giving people a definite direction to think in is what works…

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  13. Mostly just Followers. Thanks to OM reblogging my blog for the third time in under 40 days the count is more bloated but the readership remains much the same: low.

    I would like to think I have some friends here, but people just kind of drop out whenever they feel like it.

    Ultimately, substance and style will attract more substance and style, and if you have neither, your blog will be unpopular. (But being yourself, and living, will produce either or both.)

    We are still readers first.

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    • That’s true – we read only what interests us, especially now when there’s so much to choose from. Gotta grab their attention quick!
      Thanks very much for your comment, Adam! πŸ™‚

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  14. The readers who leave comments on my blog are a minority, but they’re the ones I’ve gotten to know. I come out of a print background, where you just don’t have that opportunity, so I love it–actual readers, talking back to me. A conversation! What a wonderful thing. And a lot of them are very, very funny, which is even better.

    The people who don’t leave comments, though? Well, I don’t–and can’t–leave comments on all the blogs I read (or, if they don’t grab me, zip through), so I understand (or think I understand) not commenting. Still, I’d love to know what they’re thinking.

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    • Yes, some of the comments we get are more amusing than what’s originally written in the post, aren’t they? I love getting into great discussions, whether funny or intellectual. πŸ™‚
      Thanks so much for commenting, Ellen! πŸ™‚

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  15. We like to think that we have many readers, but we know that we don’t. It doesn’t bother us really. It’s mostly about getting what we have to say out there. Maybe somebody in the future will read a post and take advise we have or relate to a story. For us it’s more of an outlet.

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  16. I truly dislike the word “follower”–it smacks of Andy Warhol and the cult of celebrity. I view the people who read my blog as kindred spirits, fellow travelers and artists. I enjoy the give and take of conversation–I often give
    only likes if I don’t know what to say but I like to try to leave a comment
    on every post I read, even if it is only one word.

    Artists who put themselves out there are always taking a risk…I like to let them know that they are appreciated.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. Reblogged this on newauthoronline and commented:
    Now here is a thought provoking post. I view my readers as individuals and see comments as a form of conversation. All my followers are important to me and I appreciate everyone who follows my ramblings.

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  18. Blogging helps me keep the creative juices flowing and gives me added practice. The fact people want to take the time to read and comment on my posts is wonderful. How do I view them? I view them as travelers and learners. And if they’re following me … a little crazy on the side. And I like a little crazy on the side.

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  19. I definitely don’t want to read my posts to anyone. But I see the visitors to my site as probably people with a common interest when I am talking about my first blog I am not Sick Boy. But with the other one Strawberries Forever, I am seeing a different type of ‘audience.’ This is a more creative, artistic group.

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  20. Reblogged this on HarsH ReaLiTy and commented:
    I view everyone on WordPress equally. Everyone here is equally retarded. Knowing and accepting that fact makes my life easier. (Queue outrage over me using the word “retarded.” -OM
    Note: Comments disabled here, please visit their post.

    Liked by 1 person

  21. I think for me, there are several categories. I am an Etsy Seller, so I have people who come by and like something and hopefully some of them turn out to be actual customers, then there are those who come by because we share similar tastes and the last are people who follow me because we have a shared interest. Some people who started as my clients as well as those who share similar interest with me have become real friends who write to me privately outside of my blogs, either via private facebook chat, email or even snail mail.

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    • It’s a great thing when someone who drops by because of a similar interest becomes a friend, isn’t it? πŸ˜€ Thanks very much for your input, Susie.
      P.S. You can snail mail me with one of your awesome address stickers any time!

      Like

  22. I think of my readers as two groups. First are people who knew me before I started blogging. They tend not to comment on my blog, but to me personally or on Facebook. The second are bloggers, including a dedicated few who read at least most of my posts and comment on them. I don’t think that much about readers as I write, other than some attempts to maintain privacy for certain real-life people. Maybe I should think more about “audience” but I am not there yet.

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    • I do find that bloggers who have people they know in real life reading their blog do tend to stay more private. When this happens it’s harder for the “audience” to understand what’s really going on sometimes. I think you maintain a good balance though, Joanne.
      Thanks for your comment. πŸ™‚

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  23. Reblogged this on William Chasterson and commented:
    Nice article!

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  24. I usually read the home page before I start reading someone’s blog, so I see them as an individuals. I want to know what drives the writing.

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  25. I agree with Deborah, I’m not comfortable with having “followers.” I consider some of the people I have “met” to be friends because they share thoughts and conversations with me like the one my friends do. I try to return that friendship. I am thrilled that people are reading the stuff I write. I hope they stick around.

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    • I, for one, am not going anywhere Dan. πŸ™‚ I agree, the comment section is more like a place to discuss than just the generic “I like that.” I think there are bloggers out there who just don’t get it – in fact I’ve known one like that personally. Thanks for the comment!

      Liked by 1 person

  26. I see my readers as being two groups. The few who actually read my writing and comment and the horde who have followed me never to be seen again. I find if I read a post I like to think I can comment on what I have read after all the author has gone to the trouble to express their ideas and thoughts and where possible I like to offer encouragement as I think we are all learning and the writing process for me is always a magical mystery tour. Must be why I like to write fairy tales.

    Liked by 1 person

    • It’s through the comments that we really connect and get to know each other… sometimes. For me I think it’s the inspiration that’s magical. It often comes from nowhere. Thanks for your comment, Michael. πŸ™‚

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  27. I think of them as readers. Some of them I count as friends, or specifically, I count as “people who understand me even better than some of my friends.” My readers make me feel less alone, which is nice, because I love to be alone, but not to feel alone.
    Some readers are writers, and I love how some of them are readers of other readers and writers, so it makes me feel like we’re all in on a joke and that brings me so much happiness πŸ˜€
    I do not think I’d enjoy my readers in a lecture hall, unless I could just write or read and go away. I don’t do well with crowds and meeting people like that would not only wear me out, but I’d feel guilty for not spending time enough with some…Nightmare idea, to me, actually!
    Excellent post, Linda!

    Liked by 3 people

  28. Way to me think, Linda! When I first decided to blog, I knew nothing about blogging. I merely wanted to begin writing more and blogging was a means towards that end. Then I began to read “how to be a blogger” type blogs. Oh my, I was scared to death. (Why was I doing this? What business do I have writing a blog, I don’t know nothin’ bout bloggin’!) I read that you must a purpose, a targeted audience…and never write a blog about “everything”….narrow it down to a topic people want to read and one in which you can give valuable expertise. I just threw up my hands and went back to my initial reason. I wrote my blog title and ended with….and a blog about everything. I guess I do need to think about who my audience is. Because I’m new at this, and don’t have many readers or commenters, I see those who read my writing as “wonderful people.” I do use conversational language and I don’t think I preach at my wonderful people, but maybe once or twice a month I write about a ministry I support because it’s ministry that does great acts for people who need great acts done for them. Here, I worry that people will read…or not read…and those that do will shake their heads and think “There she goes again.” I don’t think I’ve ever had a single comment on those posts or a single “like”. Maybe I sound preachy at those times. I don’t try to. But, I won’t sop writing about that ministry. It’s my heart. And besides I have a blog about everything, what can I expect? πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    • I think “target audience” is the one time the word “audience” really comes in handy. Knowing who your readers are is essential to being read. Then tagging properly to make sure you attract the right people to the right posts. I find a blog doesn’t really need to be about one thing specifically. It’s about going out and finding the right people to read any given post.
      Thanks for your comment Leigh. πŸ™‚

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  30. I am grateful for everyone who chooses to “follow” my blog. (I agree with the other comments about the words follow and followers – kind of weird!) I try to read and comment on many blogs, more so on those that are reading and commenting on mine; I know those readers are truly engaged. I wish I had more time to do that. When I do comment I try to make my comments thoughtful and encouraging, I guess I go by the old rule that says, “If you don’t have anything nice to say don’t say anything.” I think it is sad that there are those who seem to thrive on bashing bloggers or arguing in a nasty way. We certainly all do not agree but we can all be respectful and polite.
    Anyone watching me write would fall asleep because it takes me some time to complete a post. But once a post is done I would enjoy a chance to read and discuss it with any audience. I write what I want, when I want, how I want but ultimately I do want people to read it and I really appreciate thoughtful comments. The give and take of blogging keeps me going!

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    • That’s really what the community of WordPress is all about – the give and take of feedback. Without it, it’s a soapbox.
      Thanks so much for your thoughtful and encouraging comment, Betty! πŸ™‚

      Like

  31. Linda, I am still shocked that someone would actually want to read my posts! I absolutely love the comments I get and I find myself commenting on others’ blogs far more than I even post. It thrills me to discover other’s creative expressions through writing and to read of their experiences and perspectives.
    I get a real sense of community. While I see my readers as really awesome individuals I’d be scared to meet them in real life. I feel as if my real person shines through my posts and reflects who I am far more than my “real” persona does.

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  32. I’ve found a lot of people want to retain their anonymity and also that people are not always completely truthful online but I do think that most all are friendly and wanting to express themselves. On my main blog I have found many kindred spirits. Photography is easy to talk about and is fairly non-threatening as a subject. I’ve just started branching out speaking on other things on my other blog so we will see what happens!

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  33. I don’t write for an audience (or followers, or readers or…). I don’t consciously think about “the others” when I write, or post pictures, or whatever it is I am doing. When people comment then they become “individuals just like me only different” and I try to chat and engage with them as such. It is kind of like that for “likers” but you can’t really interact with a like; however, after a while you start recognizing gravitars and it is nice to see that “whatsherface was here.” It becomes a little, chatty community. If you promise not to tell anyone, when I see someone has followed me, my FIRST reaction is, “Why would anyone follow me?” Then it is like “Cool, they are following me!” and a inner thank you. Then I worry that if they liked what I posted “today” and they didn’t bother to see what I posted the days before that, then they are going to be really confused when the next, totally different, posts come up. I worry. Then I stop worrying and go back to wondering why I’m being followed. But don’t tell anyone that, because it is weird.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Haha! Okay, I won’t breathe a word. πŸ˜‰
      I think a lot of people feel self-conscious about their posts. I know I do sometimes – and sometimes my posts completely flop. But there’s nothing really to do but keep going.
      Thanks for your comment, Laura. πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

  34. I don’t view anyone who “follows” what I write as “followers”‘rather I see these people as kindred spirits who are kind enough and interested enough to choose to keep track of pieces I write…I appreciate each and every one and find they help encourage me to “keep on writing”..I am thankful for the time they each give to me. “Followers” in my heart humble and inspire me…

    Liked by 1 person

  35. I see my followers just like me. Individuals who are looking to read other people’s perspectives on life, love and everything else. I am grateful for every single one of them who have decided to follow me. And I love their comments. I would love more of them to comment!

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  36. Great post to get so many of us thinking, Linda G. I like to use the word “readers,” which encompasses my friends (regular readers and commentors whom I’d hang out with all the time if we lived near each other, such as you); followers (sporadic readers who drop in and out of reading touch who’d I’d stop and chat with if I ran into them at the mall or supermarket); and curious (first-time readers who’ve either spotted comment from me on somebody else’s blog or one of my social media teases that have been forwarded in front of their eyes somehow (people I’d like to be interested enough in my post to comment, come back and move up the ladder). So when I’m writing my stories, I envision that I’m telling the tale to you or Doobster or Paul or Kerbey or Rachel, any or all of my regular blog friends, who are in fact sitting across from me in a diner or next to me in the corner bar.

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  37. Interesting post. I especially like the question of whether or not we’d prefer to stand before our followers and speak a post. Because I do Spoken Word and radio I wouldn’t mind reading my post out loud, sounds exciting. I look to my followers (I like saying subscribers actually) as individuals. I picture them reading my post like I do theirs, at a computer or smartphone. I do wonder about the authenticity of likes, though I am still excited to receive them. To me its kind of like saying “Hi.” lol. I have enough sense to know everyone is not my friend, but I do appreciate the support. Commentary is different though than likes. Comments tell me those individuals who subscribed to receive my post have actually sat down and struck up a conversation before walking out the door. Obviously their like is shown to be more genuine. Not that the others aren’t, but that’s how I see it. Some people wave, others chit chat. Which are real? Well, I’ll have to get you all in one room πŸ™‚

    Like

    • “Some people wave, others chit chat.” Great analogy. πŸ™‚ It would be so interesting to see everyone together, wouldn’t it? My biggest fear would be they’d all be talking amongst themselves and ignoring me completely, like so many “followers” seem to do. πŸ˜›
      Thanks so much for your comment! πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

  38. I view them as individuals, real people with real thoughts and emotions, some I am forming friendships with, others acquaintances, I value each person that comments,likes or follows my piddly blog, I value their imput and enjoy their comments, I try to respond back to each person as quick as possible (but life often gets in the way so my responses are sometimes late) I encourage dialog and hope to bring people from all walks of life and beliefs together and expose them to different thoughts,ideas,beliefs, and to show everyone that no matter your skin color,sexuality,gender,beliefs,or back ground, when you strip all that away , we are all alike, we are all human with the same hopes and dreams and the same struggles in life, we all have the same emotions, in the end, we are all not at all that different from one another.

    Liked by 1 person

    • It’s true – no matter how we live out our lives we really are essentially the same. And that, I believe, is where this great connection comes in. Is it possible to connect with an audience as a whole? Possibly. But at a personal level it’s so much more satisfying, isn’t it?
      Thanks for your comment, Butch. πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

  39. This post is very thought provoking. I have thought the designation “followers” is kind of weird. Like a cult as someone else has said. Sometimes I jokingly think to myself about “my minions.” Not that I have a ton of “minions.” My writing is not so much for the audience although I have to admit that I do hope someone will like it. I write as a form of self-expression, creativity and for sounding off on issues I feel strongly about. It does feel good when people let me know it resonates with them or that they appreciate what I am trying to say.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I think there’s a definite need in people who blog to have people agree with them. When they don’t, well, how many internet fights have you seen? Plenty I bet.
      Thanks for your comment, Deborah. πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

      • Part of us does like it when people agree with us. I think I got in the middle of a couple of controversies without really intending to. At least I did not realize how easily you can get yourself into a fight. So I think new bloggers need to learn how to handle it when people argue against what they are saying. It takes a cool head and heart to not get upset. This I am saying from personal experience. πŸ˜€

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        • It’s difficult to pick up on people’s meanings sometimes, not being able to see their facial expressions and body language. Internet arguments are sadly more than the norm than the exception.

          Liked by 1 person

          • Yes it is easy to be misinterpreted and then I needed to realize that people will be reading my posts and comments, people that I do not know well, and reacting. And sometimes posts can be controversial even when I did not realize they had that potential. But I do not want to avoid topics just because I feel I am afraid of the reactions. But I do not like a lot of contention. It is uncomfortable for me. So I do need to think about possible reactions I guess. 😦

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  40. I think of some of the people who read my blog as friends, some as like-minded people, and maybe others as just curious. I am not great at public speaking, but did read my poems aloud and post them as I thought they sounded better spoken.
    I love to interact with people so it’s wonderful when they comment, but I do appreciate that not everyone want to.

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  41. Reblogged this on Zamboni Parade and commented:
    I’ve never really liked the term “follower” it makes this whole blogger thing sound cult-ish. “Yes my followers, in time we shall rise to become the most powerful force on Earth and take over the internet one post at a time! MUH HAH HA HA HAAA!” Yeah no, I’m not an evil mastermind dictator. I am but a humble writer using wordpress as an outlet for my thoughts on writing and other stuff. I think of my readers as people who can share my passion of storytelling and have a few laughs over the trials of writing. I think blogging is a neat tool for connecting with other people who share your passion and that’s all I intend to do. If you care to join me, be sure to put on a pair of skates because words tend to slip off my tongue when I write about my passions (and stuff).

    Liked by 2 people

    • So… we’re not all minions? Hehehe. Thanks so much for your comment and your re-blog, Zambonnie. πŸ™‚ It sounds as though you’re having a lot of fun!! πŸ˜€

      Liked by 1 person

      • Fun, laughs, mayhem, and lots of explosions… huh that should be a slogan. Anyway, thank you so much for the follow! I may not have an evil army of followers but I do have a bag of popcorn and some cool people who love writing to connect with. Also red vines if anyone’s interested, maybe some pretzels, a whole bag of potato chips, gummy bears, possibly some fro yo… yeah it’s a party.

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  42. Friends dear friends, who I hold dear !

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  43. I get stage fright, nervous, and weak-kneed before large crowds. So I’d rather hide behind my gravatar and post anonymously. That way I don’t have to imagine my audience being naked. In fact, I myself can in reality be naked, without a single twinge of nervousness. The comments make a blog fun, but I understand if someone just hits the Like button. That’s a message, too. And they may be in a hurry, or they may truly not have anything they consider worthwhile to add.

    Liked by 2 people

  44. Linda, I view my readers as individuals, just like me, sitting at a computer, a tablet, or a smartphone. I don’t really care how many likes my posts get or even how many followers I have, since I know that some — possibly most — of my “followers” don’t actually read most of my posts. But I do appreciate the interaction I get from those who take the time to actually read my posts and respond. I blogged for a number of years at another blog hosting site and comments were few and far between. It wasn’t until I started blogging on WordPress and, somehow, got “discovered” (perhaps it was after being Freshly Pressed), that the comments started rolling in. And I make every effort to read and respond to each comment I receive.

    As far as I’m concerned, there are two reasons to blog. First, it’s a creative outlet that enables me to express my thoughts, opinions, and perspectives. Blogging forces me to organize my thoughts, to do some research to ensure that my opinions have some basis in reality. But my second reason for blogging is the exchange between my readers and me in the comments section. That is probably the most rewarding part of blogging for me.

    Would I want to get up before an auditorium full of people, read a post aloud, and then interact with those who wish to comment? You bet your bippy I would.

    Liked by 2 people

  45. I think of some of them as friends, some as kindred spirits, and some as readers. To call them “followers” sounds conceited in my own ears. In any case, I think of them each as individuals and all as my audience. I wouldn’t post anything out loud to anyone, but that’s because I don’t speak well and can’t stand the sound of my own voice.

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  46. I try to comment when I visit a blog. Sometimes I forget. I get a lot of “drop-ins” who never post a comment and I wish they would. While I tell myself I write for myself, I still want what I’ve written to be read and enjoyed by others. There’s always room for critique or suggestions too.

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    • I think all of us feel the desire to be read, at least a little. Otherwise why blog publicly, right? I try to comment all the time too, but then there are times I just don’t know what to say… and sometimes everything that needs to be said has been said in the post. πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

  47. I always say they are my blog family! My blog is a stream of my thoughts and feeling- some my own family prob doesn’t even know about. πŸ™‚ I love the community i have found through blogging.

    Liked by 1 person

  48. I view my followers/readers as people, sometimes friends. I’ve often envisioned renting a conference room (or larger venue if ever I had enough followers) and hosting a party so that I could meet each and every one of them. If only I had the money to do so …

    Liked by 1 person

  49. I view the people who read my blog(I have a meager following by most standards) as people sitting at a computer just like me. One of the main reasons I blog is for the interaction. I like for the comment section to be a conversation about the content(or go wildly off-topic; whichever). “Likes” are nice but they’re kind of generic. You can never be sure if someone actually liked the content or if they’re just trying to get return views. There are some I know who comment sometimes so I know their “likes” are genuine. Others when I click on their avatar and view their content it seems perfectly obvious that they didn’t even read the post before they clicked “like”. If I wasn’t going to interact with other bloggers I doubt I’d even see a purpose in blogging.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Comments really are the icing that’s essential to the cake, aren’t they? I didn’t realize that for the first little while when I started my blog. And I do agree about the “likes”… the ones that really get me are the ones that come in before my “your post is published” page has even finished loading. πŸ˜›
      Thanks so much for your comment, Ruth. πŸ™‚

      Liked by 3 people

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