Linda G. Hill

Life in progress

9 Things I Learned From Not Blogging Every Day

73 Comments

As a blogger who has gone from posting occasionally, to every day and then back to once in a while, I’ve found there are both advantages and disadvantages to both methods. Some of the good points only apply to the blog itself, but some are important factors for general well-being. Here is my list:

For the Blog

  1. Posting every day creates a momentum. I often got almost as many views from the post of the day before as I did the current one, thus doubling the number of views. When posting only occasionally, views plummet on days I don’t post.
  2. Time of day is important! Even though I posted every day for a year on my fiction blog, the number of views went down if I published after eight at night. It was the same deal if I posted too early. Followers get used to seeing you at the same time every day.
  3. It doesn’t matter how frequent posts are on a fiction blog – fiction gets fewer views. Period. My theory is that if people want to read fiction, they’ll usually pick up a book.
  4. Even if you take a break, people will come back. Especially people who really like what you write.

 

For Life in General

  1. Not posting every day means more exercise – just as well, my butt was getting square.
  2. Not blogging means more time for other projects, including ones that come with getting a square butt. Still a plus.
  3. Posting every day provides a constant means of interaction with other humans. I have to say, I don’t laugh nearly as much when I’m away from WordPress.
  4. Going back and forth from daily blogging to not gives a perspective of what’s important in life. Yes, obviously family is the most important thing, but for me as a writer, so is being able to write. Without a steady outlet of my thoughts onto the screen, I become more irritable – which is not necessarily a good thing for my family either. Therefore, my final point is,
  5. Balance is essential! I’m still working on finding mine.

 

My conclusion, as I’ve come to realize it, is that as much as I hear everyone say “real life” is more important than being online, it depends what I do with my online life, and equally what I do with my life offline. I think it’s okay to spend a healthy amount of time sitting at a keyboard if that time is productive and provides an outlet rather than an escape (though escape is important too). I’d like to start posting every day again: mostly what I’ve learned by not doing so, is that it’s okay to walk away. I guess that’s actually ten things, isn’t it. 😛

What do you think? Can you add to the list?

 

Author: LindaGHill

There's a writer in here, clawing her way out.

73 thoughts on “9 Things I Learned From Not Blogging Every Day

  1. Reblogged this on Mysticalwriter.

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  2. I suppose it depends on what your objectives are. I post to share. I’m not trying to build numbers. When I find, see, do or learn something interesting (to me) I share it. It is much like walking with a friend and saying, “Look at that tree. Isn’t it beautiful? It’s a Live Oak”. On the other hand, if my day was spent doing laundry and cleaning the floors I don’t feel the need to share that. I don’t want to make up something just to post every day and get the numbers up. That is much like a person who talks too much. That’s just me.

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    • Hehe. I barely talk – I think that’s maybe why I need to write.
      I blog more to connect. I find there’s nothing quite like knowing there’s someone out there who’s going through the same joys, weaknesses, struggles, and adventures as I am. And I love helping others connect too!
      One of my own biggest weaknesses though is that I’m a bit of a perfectionist. If I set out to do something, I feel I must do everything in my power to complete it.
      Thanks for sharing your thoughts, Dinata. 🙂

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  3. Hi. I started off blogging at random times. Now I blog once a week. I have tried to do it at the same time, but I find that is impossible, but it’s usually in the afternoon at some time.
    I can’t find the time to blog more often as I have several books on the go that need finishing, and I’ve just started NaNoWriMo this month, (For those not in the know, it’s National Novel Writing Month, and the aim is to write 50,000 words in the month of November. I’m already behind schedule!) I aim to finish one of my books this month.
    As well as writing, there’s life, as some of you have said. We need to eat, therefore I need to shop and cook. Yes, my husband sometimes cooks, but not every day. Then there are friends to see, exercise to get, and fun to have. I wish I could blog every day, but there you go!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hey there, Aspholessaria! Not being able to actually be in front of the screen at the same time each week (or day) is where the post scheduling feature comes in really handy. Just type it, schedule it and forget about it until you have time to go in and see if you’ve had some comments. You should give that a try. 🙂
      Best of luck with NaNo! I’ve participated four times – wish I could join in this year but I’m going on vacation in a couple of weeks. 🙂

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  4. you nailed it. days I don’t blog reviews can drop to zero. I suppose it makes sense, why go to a blog if there’s nothing new … one of the joys of following 🙂

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  5. This is so interesting, Linda. I’ve been posting once a week, juggling blogging with my “day job” and my “real” life. I have found that I like to write and it’s the old story, the more one practices the better one gets. That said, the end of the year is approaching (and summer for us (yay!)), and I’m tired. Lots of ideas running around in my head but not so much energy. What I do is have a notebook – a real one – and I note ideas and then go back to that when I’m a bit jaded and think I’ve run out of ideas. What also worked for me earlier this year (and I think I mentioned it in another comment), is to schedule posts. That really worked for me – I was both busy and energised.

    And yes, I think there’s a danger of spending too much time online and browsing through the reader without “just getting on with it”.

    Now I need to get off *my* square butt and forage in the garden before I do the dinner!

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    • Ah, those square butts, eh? Haha!
      I agree, it’s so hard to blog when you’re tired, even when you’ve got some great ideas. It really is all about the balance in the end. Thanks for commenting, Fiona. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  6. The thrill of the first few posts. I wish i could post everyday but i have found out that other things needed my attention. Right now i am trying hard at ensuring that i post at least two post per week. I do a feature once a month as well as a fashion post per week…these two blog ideas are intended to keep me writing. Usually i try not to disappoint my followers since i have promised to do these posts. But generally i try to enjoy my blogging time and experience plus attempts at riding myself of guilt for not having the time to post. I actually got encouraged about not to feeling guilty for not posting sometimes from this post. Great points Linda!

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    • It really comes down to knowing your own limits and honouring them – that last bit can be the hardest part. Thanks very much for your comment! I’m glad I was able to help. 🙂

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  7. Reblogged this on Dream Big, Dream Often and commented:
    Here is a post discussing the benefits of low-volume blogging. It is up to each individual to determine their level of participation!

    Liked by 1 person

  8. I tried to stay away from my blog… and it bit me…

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  9. Great list. I like your final comments. There is no going back for m now that I’ve found my blog. Writing is essential. My blog is my outlet.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. I came into my blogging experience aiming to post every week. Once writing became part of my routine, i’d feel guilty if I wasn’t able to share something for a week or two. Life happens! So I try to play it by ear. I have production goals that I want to reach as the blog grows, but i’m also hoping to keep my once-a-week posting schedule. If I have to up my game for a bit, that’s fine, but the balance -for me- is making sure I don’t pressure myself too hard, and keep things fun. When i’m in a zen-like state, and everything in my daily life is flowing, my writing benefits greatly. So with that being said, I love the list, and I couldn’t agree more with everything you’ve shared. Focus on your balance and zen, and everything else will organically come together 🙂

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  11. I really like this post! It gives a great perspective for those of us new to blogging! Thanks!

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  12. I’m wondering about this at the moment, and it seems as if there isn’t really a definite answer, maybe the focus should be to blog as much or as little as you feel happy doing? Definitely getting out to walk from time to time seems a good idea to me!

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  13. Reblogged this on ~Idiot Writing~ and commented:
    Not much to add – Linda says it all. 🙂

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  14. Just – yes. Gotsta allow for ebbs ‘n flows. I feel like I am seriously taking a sabbatical on it ALL. I want to focus on my art really for a while. Having said that I may do a splurge. I do enjoy the momentum blogging of which you speak…. I do so so enjoy it… but it detracts just that little bit TOO much from so many other things that I want to and need to give attention to. So – something has to give. But I don’t think I could pack it in completely somehow. I don’t even call myself a writer any more… I cannot give it the attention it needs, I was always first and foremost an artist. 😉

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  15. Timing! I have just stopped posting everyday and I read your post with interest. You make some valid points. I made it to 100 days of my daily project and was aiming at posting every day for a year but just decided I didn’t have to keep it up. I enjoyed it, got more views and followers but nobody seems to miss my daily posts too much. I am missing the activity of writing, scheduling and organising posts but feel as if the pressure has lifted a bit. I have a very busy and active ‘real life’ to live too I decided.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. A bit off topic but just what is this “real life?” Once there was a wall but now the characters in my head who tell me their stories in order to emerge in my books are every bit as real and approachable for me as, say, the Queen of England. I can only know the thrill of climbing Everest or of finding sunken treasure through the accounts of others and those are, in essence, no less an illusion than the fictional pieces I “create.” I recently published my latest book and now a profound sense of emptiness has replaced all those characters that I have lived with over the past year or so. One day a new protagonist will begin to whisper in my ear but until then I suppose “real life” will have to suffice.

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    • Oh I am so with you on this! When I finished writing my epic novel (that I’m still editing) I went through a totally unexpected depression that lasted about two weeks. I hadn’t realized how dependent I’d become on those characters being there in my consciousness all the time, me always wondering what they’d do next. It’s disconcerting having no “next”!

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  17. I am reading Stephen King’s book “On Writing” and he makes the comment, ” People that want to be better writers have to do it every day.” But then, he doesn’t quote an amount. Two sentences, two pages, …
    I’m cool with once a week posting, but hard on myself if I haven’t worked on personal writing projects on the other days!

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  18. I spent one week posting every day, by accident. It’s a pace I could never sustain. I dropped back to three days a week with an occasional re-blog thrown in.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Ooops! I posted. …how exactly do you post by accident, Dan? Haha! Nah, I know what you mean. Sometimes things come up that we just can’t resist. It’s good to set a realistic schedule for yourself, but it takes discipline!

      Liked by 1 person

  19. This is a huge thing for me. There is such a thing as “online addiction” and I’ve battled this severely in the past. You’re right about the momentum but I start wondering why the momentum is so important. What really do I gain from it except creating more momentum. I’m trying not to be here quite as much and I’m finding I enjoy it a whole lot more when I’m not glued to the keyboard. Thanks for posting this. It’s so important that we ask ourselves why we are here constantly.

    Liked by 1 person

  20. I have been posting nearly daily for the past few weeks, which is unusual for me. It has helped me build followers a bit more quickly. I find myself writing shorter posts than usual. I’m not sure how much longer I will keep it up. I have a number of activities starting up, so there will be less time for blogging and more devoted to poetry.

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  21. I finally decided that I’ll just post whenever I want and whatever I want. Sometimes it could be every day, maybe even twice a day; other times, there could be a significant lag between posts – although I try to post at least twice a week if I can (with one of those posts being a re-blog). I’m afraid that if I’m away for too long, my readers will forget about me.

    Liked by 1 person

  22. There’s that middle ground of “not posting but reading others’ blogs” that can be just as stressful as posting. When I took a WP break, I had to make an actual break from reading and writing, hard as it was. What I found out was that the people who “get” me and mutually get along with were there and understood the reasons behind it all 🙂

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  23. I like posting 3-4 times a week. There are certain blogs I visit as much as they post, and certain ones I only see on Wednesdays and Thursdays. I only read what I want to, and it’s my own time, I can do what I want 😉
    If I read the blogs of all the people I follow, I wouldn’t have any time at all. I’d be online rise to fall and that wouldn’t be good!

    Liked by 2 people

  24. Thanks Linda, good insights. I am just getting into this blogging thing, finding my feet so to speak. When I did the Blogging 101 course I posted every day but I must confess, sometimes my work and other responsibilities suffered. I am trying to find a balance now, posting short pieces especially flash fiction which I feel might improve my writing. I still want to keep the theme of my blog though so I need to do at least one post a week in that direction.

    Jenny Young youngjennylee@gmail.com jennyyoung.co.za

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  25. I was thinking about this as well since my blogging has been hit and miss all summer. I think you hit on most of what I’ve been thinking though. Thanks, Linda!

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  26. I can’t do a daily post on my blog, there’s just too much research that goes into every post. But, a few months ago I did a series on the parables that had me posting 2-3 per week. Not only did my counts go up during that period, but so did my followers. So, yes, posting more frequently does have its advantages, but it does take away a lot of free time. Gives me a appreciation for bloggers like OM and Don Charisma who post more than once a day.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I don’t read Don’s blog very often, but I have a good idea of how much research goes into many of Jason’s posts… ahem. Posting shouldn’t be a full time job unless there’s a lot of dedication behind it (and money) – not something many of us can afford. It’s one of the reasons I love my One-Liner Wednesdays. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  27. I have a daily blogging routine and I love it. I wish I could just be satisfied with blogging but sadly there are books to write and I have to do those as well.

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  28. Sometimes blogging feels like work for me, which runs counter to the spirit of being retired. I’ve had to adjust, in order to keep it fun. But like you, I think I spend more time laughing and enjoying myself when blogging, than when not. I think one problem is, this is a very new form of social interaction to humankind. There hasn’t been enough time for social scientists to understand it thoroughly, and determine what kind of blogging is healthy and what isn’t. We all have to go by our own feel, without reliable guidelines.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Definitely one of those ‘go with your gut instincts’ things. It is a lot of work! It’s a dedication that has no precedent. We’re like the leaders of our own little kingdoms… or soapboxes… we have a responsibility! If that’s not work, I don’t know what is!

      Liked by 1 person

  29. So eerie that you just posted this as I was debating not updating today on either one of my blogs. I feel like I spent so much time yesterday reading blogs, and the day before writing, that I have just absolutely missed out on activities with my daughters and home upkeep. The balance is lost on me as I am an incredibly slow reader as a dyslexic. A blog post that would take the normal person 5 minutes to read can take up to 20 to 30 minutes to read based on the actual layout and content. Each post takes of course at least one-two hours so that it is not written backwards or in gibberish, that’s not including my research time, and then it is quite disheartening when I stay up until two am on the blog for maybe one unresponsive reader to happen upon it according to stats as I spend my entire day reading and commenting on other blogs.

    I’m thinking I’ll go to updating perhaps not everyday but instead as my mind allows me to enter the zone at ease.

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