Linda G. Hill

Life in progress


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#SoCS – Language

I find the mechanics of language both fascinating and frustrating. The acrobatics your tongue needs to accomplish when making its way around different languages is something I’ve never really mastered. I know enough French to make my way around Quebec without getting arrested–in Japan… let’s just say if I was about to be arrested, I was totally oblivious. Yet in the case of speaking French, I barely do. I can read most of it, and I can understand a lot of it when someone is speaking to me, but actually forming the words myself? I trip over my tongue like it’s six feet long. When I lived on the Quebec side of the Ottawa River, my local grocery store employees were used to me. They’d speak French, I spoke English, everything was understood and there was no gross salivation to worry about.

Japanese is a much easier language to speak. There’s very little tongue rolling going on, and most of the consonants sound the same as they do in English. Reading it? Pfft. Although I got to know the kanji for place names when I was there (because at the train stations they’re displayed in English, kana, and kanji), and obviously I learned the difference between “Men” and “Women” before I stepped off Canadian soil, much of the written language may as well be Greek. Or Japanese.

Lip reading, on the other hand, is a whole different subject when considering the tongue. Try it: say “dada” and “data.” Concentrate on what your lips look like when you say the two words. No difference. What changes is the position of the tongue. Even trying to say it with your mouth open, it’s impossible to show the difference to a deaf person. I was introduced to this difficulty when my Deaf son, Alex, was about four years old. The local children’s hospital (CHEO in Ottawa) had him in a program to see if he could ever learn to speak. He had hearing aids at the time, but they only allowed him to hear very loud noises. Speech wasn’t one of them. Eventually it was determined that because he never learned to suck as a baby (he’s tube fed to this day and he’s 16 years old) he’d never have the muscle control to speak. We gave up on the hearing aids when he started getting ear infections every other week. But back to the tongue. There are a few sounds that we make when we speak that are impossible to discern from our lips.

Holy spit balls, Batman! I just realized where the expression “mother tongue” came from! Sucking as a baby!!

…and, now I can’t concentrate on my stream of consciousness anymore.

This post is brought to you by Stream of Consciousness Saturday. To find the rules and join in, click the following link. Please do – it’s fun!! https://lindaghill.com/2017/05/12/the-friday-reminder-and-prompt-for-socs-may-1317/


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One-Liner Wednesday – Foreigner

My son wrote on my fridge, “I wanna know what love iiisss…” but I, being the mom I am, couldn’t stand to leave it alone. An ode to my barren back yard:

I wanna know what grass is I want you to mow me

Here’s the song.

____________________________________________________________________________

If you would like to participate, feel free to use the “One-Liner Wednesday” title in your post, and if you do,
you can ping back here to help your blog get more exposure. To execute a ping back, just copy the URL in the address bar on this post, and paste it somewhere in the body of your post. Your link will show up in the comments below. Please ensure that the One-Liner Wednesday you’re pinging back to is this week’s! Otherwise, no one will likely see it but me.

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As with Stream of Consciousness Saturday (SoCS), if you see a ping back from someone else in my comment section, click and have a read. It’s bound to be short and sweet.

Unlike SoCS, this is not a prompt so there’s no need to stick to the same “theme.”

The rules that I’ve made for myself (but don’t always follow) for “One-Liner Wednesday” are:

1. Make it one sentence.

2. Try to make it either funny or inspirational.

3. Use our unique tag #1linerWeds.

4. Add our very cool badge to your post for extra exposure!

5. Have fun!

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Veil – #AtoZChallenge

There are days when I wish I could go out in public with a veil over my head: mostly Tuesday through Monday.

We conceal ourselves in so many different ways. From wearing makeup and masks, to hiding behind a computer screen. We pretend–to be more important, smart, beautiful, rich, compassionate–but to what result? In the end, our real nature always shines through.

So I’ve decided to come clean. Right here, right now. Are you ready?

Almost every night for the past three weeks I’ve been too tired to write interesting blog posts. There. I said it. I’m stubborn (because I HAVE to live up to this challenge) to the extent that I’d rather keep myself up at night and blather through my exhaustion than give up.

Tomorrow I’ll try to post earlier. Ugh.

Okay, here’s the real confession:

I’m trying to put you to sleep too.

I’m a terrible person.

***
You know what’s not terrible? My A to Z Challenge-inspired novelette, “All Good Stories”! It’s a romantic comedy about two best friends who belong together – Xavier knows it, but Jupiter has her eye on another guy: a shady character named Bob.

“A delightful read!!” ~ Cheryl Lynn Roberts, 4 stars, Amazon Canada review

“A short funny tale of two friends” ~ Ritu, 4 stars, Amazon UK review

“Quirky and charming.” ~ Bobby Underwood, #11 top reviewers on Goodreads – 5 stars

Click the picture to find it on Kindle, or get it on Kobo here: https://www.kobo.com/ca/en/ebook/all-good-stories


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Urban – #AtoZChallenge

The word “urban” is making me want to cheat and find another word.

Although, according to Merriam-Webster online, urban means “of, relating to, characteristic of, or constituting a city,” the word always conjures houses on the outskirts of a city. The city is where the businesses and apartment buildings are, and the residential areas are urban. No?

Or maybe I’m thinking of the suburbs. Which I suppose means sub (below) the urbs (the city).

I’ve only once lived outside of the urbs. On a farm where I shoveled horse poop for a living. Such a glamorous job, and yet so rewarding. I know some people just can’t stand to reside in the city, and some wouldn’t live in the country unless they were dragged there kicking and screaming. Me? I’m comfortable anywhere. I love the quiet and I enjoy the constant noise–mostly because after a while I don’t hear it anymore.

Then again, crickets are everywhere in the summer.

***
Want something to drown out the crickets? Then buy my A to Z Challenge-inspired novelette, “All Good Stories”! You won’t hear them over the sound of your own giggling.

It’s a romantic comedy about two best friends who belong together – Xavier knows it, but Jupiter has her eye on another guy: a shady character named Bob.

“A delightful read!!” ~ Cheryl Lynn Roberts, 4 stars, Amazon Canada review

“A short funny tale of two friends” ~ Ritu, 4 stars, Amazon UK review

“Quirky and charming.” ~ Bobby Underwood, #11 top reviewers on Goodreads – 5 stars

Click the picture to find it on Kindle, or get it on Kobo here: https://www.kobo.com/ca/en/ebook/all-good-stories


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Tinge – #AtoZChallenge

My dog adds a smattering of love to my life, and a sprinkling of privy to my back yard.

It’s no surprise that I love words. They are why writing, to me, is such a glorious challenge. Finding just the right one is like discovering a hidden treasure. It’s like fitting in that piece of a thousand-piece puzzle that I’ve been looking for for hours. And what makes it such a challenge? It’s the tinge a word can put on a feeling. The morsel that’s as small as a speck. The discomfort that’s really a vexation. The gladness that turns to euphoria. And the exhaustion that leads to zonking out.

Zzzzz…

No, seriously. I’m going to bed. Winston’s making me jealous.

***
Would you like a dash of amusement in your day? A pinch of jollification, perhaps? Then buy my A to Z Challenge-inspired novelette, “All Good Stories”! It’s a romantic comedy about two best friends who belong together – Xavier knows it, but Jupiter has her eye on another guy: a shady character named Bob.

“A delightful read!!” ~ Cheryl Lynn Roberts, 4 stars, Amazon Canada review

“A short funny tale of two friends” ~ Ritu, 4 stars, Amazon UK review

“Quirky and charming.” ~ Bobby Underwood, #11 top reviewers on Goodreads – 5 stars

Click the picture to find it on Kindle, or get it on Kobo here: https://www.kobo.com/ca/en/ebook/all-good-stories

 


24 Comments

Raw – #AtoZChallenge

Real men eat it on the hoof.

The above quote is from a late friend of my father’s. He said it every time he cooked a steak, and though I thought he meant a cow, he always ate his beef medium rare… Ah, the 1970s. I was so young and innocent.

I had a friend of my own, of German heritage, who enjoyed eating raw hamburger meat with spices mixed into it. When I was in Japan, I was given a raw egg to mix with some kind of powder, to pour on my rice for breakfast. I left the egg in its shell. Why? Because here in North America we’re told to cook our food, and if, God forbid, we come in contact with it when it’s raw, DISINFECT! That stuff’s poison! Except there are so many people who survive other cultures.

A few months back, someone died because they ate raw salmon here in Ontario. Yet I love–I luuuuurve salmon sushi. So what’s the diff? Seriously, maybe someone out there can tell me. My best guesses are that they serve fresher meat (and eggs) in other countries, or that they’re more careful to keep their products at a safe temperature.

I’ve eaten raw bacon and survived. I’ve licked the cake-batter bowl clean. And don’t even get me started on cookie dough. Ugh! Nomnomnom.

What do you eat raw?

***
You know what you don’t need to cook before you consume it? My A to Z Challenge-inspired novelette, “All Good Stories”! It’s a romantic comedy about two best friends who belong together – Xavier knows it, but Jupiter has her eye on another guy: a shady character named Bob.

“A delightful read!!” ~ Cheryl Lynn Roberts, 4 stars, Amazon Canada review

“A short funny tale of two friends” ~ Ritu, 4 stars, Amazon UK review

“Quirky and charming.” ~ Bobby Underwood, #11 top reviewers on Goodreads – 5 stars

Click the picture to find it on Kindle, or get it on Kobo here: https://www.kobo.com/ca/en/ebook/all-good-stories


12 Comments

Purloin – #AtoZChallenge

Confession time: the word “purloin” has always reminded me of a nice, juicy piece of medium-rare beef .

I have to say thank you to my poor thesaurus today. For all the complaints I’ve bestowed upon it this month for some of the crappy words I’ve ended up with, this one makes up for them. I love the word “purloin” not because it’s a great word in and of itself, nor because it makes my mouth water, but for its synonyms. Reading through them in my thesaurus is like taking a page out of a noir detective movie starring Humphrey Bogart.

Bugsy made off with the goods, see? He musta pinched them when no one was looking, that dirty, no good thief. We’ve been snaffled.

“Filch, finger, lift, pocket, snitch, and swipe” are a few more.

With that, I think I’ll go to the store and appropriate a steak tomorrow. With my debit card, see?

***
Wanna read my A to Z Challenge-inspired novelette, “All Good Stories”? You don’t have to pilfer it–it’s only 99¢ on Kindle and Kobo. It’s a romantic comedy about two best friends who belong together – Xavier knows it, but Jupiter has her eye on another guy: a shady character named Bob.

“A delightful read!!” ~ Cheryl Lynn Roberts, 4 stars, Amazon Canada review

“A short funny tale of two friends” ~ Ritu, 4 stars, Amazon UK review

“Quirky and charming.” ~ Bobby Underwood, #11 top reviewers on Goodreads – 5 stars

Click the picture to find it on Kindle, or get it on Kobo here: https://www.kobo.com/ca/en/ebook/all-good-stories