Linda G. Hill

Life in progress

JusJoJan 22 – Kamakura, Japan – Part 1

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From Yokohama Station I hopped on another train which took me to the little seaside town of Kamakura. I’d done my research online before I went – it’s a place with lots of Temples, a little shopping street (by little I mean narrow, not short) and had what I thought would be a nice, inexpensive place to stay. In a word, it was beautiful.

Villa Sacra in Kamakura is a little inn with several uniquely decorated rooms. A very old, traditional Japanese house, the floors creak, the ceilings are low, and the hospitality is fabulous.

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The room, however, was quite small. I spent most of my time out wandering the shopping street, eating at Mister Donut – hey, it was cheap and free refills on the coffee! – and walking. Oh boy did I walk. I’d estimate about 4-6 hours a day, rain or shine.

I was in my room for the only earthquake I felt. At first I thought it was someone leaning against the wall behind me. The walls were thin enough that I could feel the people in the next room, but the rumbling sound and the extensive swaying of the entire room led me to believe otherwise. When I looked it up on the internet (I had excellent WiFi), sure enough I was on the outskirts of a quake. It wasn’t nearly as frightening as I thought it might have been, probably because if the house had been standing that long already, it wasn’t likely to fall down while I was there, right? Right.

Besides, I had other things to worry about. I wrote this in my notebook over coffee:

December 9th, 2014 – Mister Donut, Kamakura

I’ve been sitting by the window for about 20 minutes on this lovely bright sunny day and so far only one person has walked by in sunglasses. Okay, now it’s two. But that’s among hundreds. This must be a nation of people with eyesight issues.

Not that that’s the biggest danger here – every 3rd hydro pole has a sign that says “Be careful of tsunamis,” stating that here we are just a little more than 5 meters above sea level. Be careful – as though if you see one, just step around it.

I think I’ve been bitten by a mosquito. In December. Life is good.

After that I took a day trip to Enoshima. It is, apparently, the honeymoon capital of Japan. In a way this seems appropriate, like if you can handle the uphill climb here, you can handle being married.

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December 9th, 2014, Enoshima (Island)

An island carved in rock and surrounded by the Pacific Ocean, yet not too far from land that one can’t walk here across a bridge, it is populated by shrines and hawks. I’ve now seen my very first “Beware of the Hawks” sign.

I tried to get a few pictures of the hawks but they’re fast fliers.

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I managed to nab this one in a tree.

The weather was gorgeous – in the tens to low teens, celsius the entire time I was in Kamakura. The food was fantastic and very inexpensive – I managed to eat for between 500-1000 yen ($5 to $10 Cdn.) most days. Lots of seafood, as you can well imagine.

I was going to write about my entire time in Kamakura in one shot, but there’s still so much to tell. I’ll try to write again soon!

This post is part of Just Jot It January: click the link and join in! https://lindaghill.com/2015/01/01/just-jot-it-january-pingback-post-and-rules/

JJJ 2015

 

Author: LindaGHill

There's a writer in here, clawing her way out.

11 thoughts on “JusJoJan 22 – Kamakura, Japan – Part 1

  1. Pingback: Tokyo, Japan – Part 1 | lindaghill

  2. Trip of a lifetime, wonderful photos! ❤

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  3. Nice – beautiful pictures Linda. Thank you.

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  4. Quite beautiful, Linda G. You felt the earth move in Japan, and I’m sure glad the seas didn’t swell.

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  5. I didn’t travel as far west as you did when I was in Japan but I agree with you about the food, it was relatively cheap and I decided that I would try everything that landed in front of me. That was an experience as a traditional Japanese breakfast doesn’t include toast but rather seemed a variation on the evening meal.
    I also found the people incredibly polite and hospitable.
    I also experienced an earthquake and within minutes of it Fumiko, my cousin’s Japanese wife, would have the TV on as there would be posted everything you needed to know about the event including any tsunami warnings.
    My next visit I plan to go to some the places you mention today.

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