Linda G. Hill

Life in progress

Just Jot It Jan 24 – Elusive

22 Comments

“Any word you have to hunt for in a thesaurus is the wrong word.” ~ Stephen King

I used to agree with this wholeheartedly. I still do agree with the gist of it; if it’s not a word you regularly use in your everyday vocabulary, then you’re writing outside of your own voice. And your authorial voice is, arguably, the one thing people read you for. You as opposed to the thousands of other authors who write in the same genre, the same tropes over and over again.

But now? Now that I can’t remember my kids’ names half the time and I often get stuck on a word I know I know, but I just can’t spit it out? The thesaurus has become my favourite book. Can’t come up with that word I use all the time that means “thingamajig”? Look it up in the thesaurus and there it is. It’s a “doohickey”!

Sorry, Mr. King, but I can’t live without my thesaurus. And no, it’s not the wrong word. It’s just the word that went for a stroll. The one I can’t find. You know, the “elusive” one. Yeah, that’s the word.

compromise

Thanks to Evelyn of Eclectic Evelyn for today’s prompt word, “elusive.” You can find her latest post here: http://www.eclecticevelyn.com/welcome-snapchat-wordlesswednesday/

And an enormous thank you to Judy, the hostess with the mostess for the last few days. I can’t express how much I’ve appreciated her help. You can find Judy’s elusive post here: http://www.edwinasepisodes.com/jujojan-january-24th-elusive/ Let’s have a big round of applause for Judy!! πŸ˜€

And finally, here’s the daily post with today’s Just Jot It January prompt. Click and join in! https://lindaghill.com/2017/01/23/jusjojan-daily-prompt-jan-24th-elusive/

Author: LindaGHill

There's a writer in here, clawing her way out.

22 thoughts on “Just Jot It Jan 24 – Elusive

  1. It’s wonderful that you are getting ideas from this post as well as from
    our discussion made at this time.

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  2. Natalie Goldberg, who wrote “Writing Down The Bones,” recommends Rodale’s “Synonym Finder.” I have a copy, but I’ve gotten used to using the Free Dictionary and getting the synonyms from there. Helps a lot, especially when someone comes up with the prompt “impenetrable.” πŸ˜„

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  3. I disagree with the master, though. There are times, plenty of times, when I like seeing an unusual word in my reading, and look it up, and reread the sentence, and smile. I like a few peppered in πŸ™‚ New words, good stuff.

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    • I do too, but for most people I think it’s like anything else these days – make them work and they immediately lose interest. Then again, there are books in which it’s obvious that all of a sudden the author picked up a thesaurus and it’s the only time they did. EL James’ medulla oblongata immediately springs to mind. πŸ˜›

      Liked by 1 person

  4. I too disagree with Mr King. If we didn’t use a thesaurus how would we learn new words? And sometimes you need another word because if you keep using the same ones life can get boring!

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  5. As my friends and I reached menopause we found the https://www.amazon.com/Flip-Dictionary-Barbara-Ann-Kipfer/dp/1582971404/ref=sr_1_8?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1485326925&sr=1-8&keywords=reverse+dictionary to be the best! Unfortunately, it is in a different room than where I am and is too big to tote back and forth. It is fun to leaf through, too.

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  6. I must say I like my thesaurus, just to get an understanding of the use of some words! Oh, and to replace when I may be overusing some favourites!

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  7. What’s another word for “thesaurus”?

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  8. During my master’s, I’ve gotten used to writing academic papers with highfalutin words so when I started writing my first book I always had to right click on synonyms and thesaurus to find more common terms. ProWriting keeps saying I use plenty of “corporate” words. Hahaha.

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  9. I think often we sort of can feel the word but it only comes to as after we look in the thesaurus. It helps if it’s a recognizable word, though. Some people pick the most obscure synonyms sometimes πŸ˜‚.

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