Life in progress

EDDD 25 – Trust Your Instincts

32 Comments

‘Twas the night before Christmas
And all ’round the kitchen
There was choking and coughing
My son, he was bitchin’

…that his head ached, he was dizzy, tired, and everything hurt. It was about half an hour after dinner. Within the next fifteen minutes he was asleep on the couch and his breathing was fast and shallow.

I started looking to the internet for solutions as to what could be wrong. All day he’d been active, happy, and looking forward to opening his presents. On a hunch I looked up ‘aspiration.’ Bingo. I checked his temp. He was burning up.

Fifteen minutes later we were at the hospital. By midnight he’d had an x-ray – they found a piece of food lodged in his right lung. It took one hour for him to go from fine to having aspiration pneumonia. He’s at home now, happily playing with his new Wii U, on antibiotics.

I’ve said it so many times and I’ll say it again. A mother knows her child much better than any doctor can. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve been in a position where I’ve had to tell a doctor flat out that he or she was wrong. I’ve demanded a second opinion from a pediatrician more than once.

This wasn’t the case last night, however this post is to say that if you are a mother, always trust your instincts over a doctor’s opinion.

Had I not trusted my instincts, the scenario right now could have been much much worse. Apparently the chances of survival for this sort of thing depends on early detection.

A Christmas miracle indeed. Merry Christmas everyone!

Blog post of December 25th, in honour of Every Damn Day December. Check it out!

Author: Linda G. Hill

There's a writer in here, clawing her way out.

32 thoughts on “EDDD 25 – Trust Your Instincts

  1. Oh Linda, it never rains but it pours. I hope all is well for you now. Here’s to a better New Year πŸ™‚

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  2. I’m glad he’s safe. Merry Christmas Linda.

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  3. So glad your son is better and that you trusted your instincts. Given my own experiences with doctors, I see them as human, meaning that they are fallible and nothing they say should be taken at face value. Thank goodness for the mom you are.

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    • Thanks very much, Marie. Some doctors just stick every kid into the same box and fail to see their history, in my experience. I didn’t learn how to pronounce hypertrophic cardiomyopathy for the fun of it, so it bugs me when they won’t listen to me… as I’m sure is the case for most parents.

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  4. You are right, a mother knows her kids best. No one doctor have the same knowledge like our experience. Great your son has a good time now.
    Irene

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    • It’s our experience with our own kids specifically – some kids are highly active, some aren’t, for instance. No doctor can tell whether MY child, specifically, is behaving normally. I’m glad he’s doing better. πŸ™‚

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  5. Pretty scary thing for you and your boy. Glad this turned out to be a good Christmas and not a tragic one.

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  6. Right on mom! I’ve done the same thing myself when my kids were growing much to the chagrin of nurses, their feathers definitely got ruffled and I spoke to doctors like we were equals. Don’t mess with my babies.

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  7. Good save, Mama!
    I agree. A mother knows. Doctors are for well-checks, prescriptions and worries, lol!

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  8. Good job! Mothering goes on long past the elementary years.

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  9. How fortunate of you to be that keenly aware of his breathing and find that on the PC. Blessings being sent to you and your home. Brenda πŸ™‚

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    • And to you and yours, Brenda. Thank you πŸ™‚

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      • Another day of who knows what in your life Linda. You appear to be prepared for any incidents and have the ability to handle much that is thrown into your every day. I admire and respect you as a mother and a human being. Your good nature and responsibility takes massive power, and you have that. God is making you stronger and stronger. Hugs, Brenda

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        • Well, you know what they say – what doesn’t kill you just makes you stronger, right?

          Thanks so much for your kind words and your encouragement, Brenda. Much appreciated. πŸ™‚

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          • I know your challenges as I have chronic illnesses that prevent me from living a normal life. Far from normal as I am housebound the majority of the time. Loads of meds in my plastic baggie which is my medicine cabinet used to refill my daily week’s worth of every color and shape of pill.

            Yet, my life is a piece of cake next to yours as a caregiver. It wears one down as much as being the sick one. I will be here to remind you of how gracious you are with your children and friends…..

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            • Thank you so much, Brenda. I’m sorry you live with poor health, but I can see that you too manage to see the blessings in life. I think as long as we don’t lose our perspective we can survive just about anything. πŸ™‚

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  10. So glad he’s okay. We do know our kids better; you’re right. Merry Christmas. I hope you all enjoy the day

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  11. Quite a memorable Christmas that you’re having!

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  12. Glad your son is okay and enjoying his video games.

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  13. I’m so glad you got everything taken care of.

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